Today’s world lacks boundaries and thanks to social media, there are very few between your personal and professional persona. This can, for some, make it difficult to be your true self as you expose your personal quirks, struggles or experiences with a client. At the end of the day it’s mostly a choice as to who you let ‘in’ and who stays on the periphery. I realised the impact of the crossover on Mother’s Day, when my youngest daughter, also a redhead, made me a card that clearly identified herself as a GinjaNinja. It makes me immensely proud, but also served as a vital reminder that I am always an example and my role as a single Mother is not just to cover the basics, but to provide inspiration, confidence and teach her to dream big. That all I do is always there for her to see and to be impacted by.  It’s what makes this hard, you essentially on show, and have to acknowledge and realise the power you yield with a blank canvas and young, pliable mind. How do I manage it? If nothing else, I am honest, I own who I am, flaws and all. My girls know it, my friends and family and even my clients. It’s not a bad strategy to have in PR either, and is something that is often lacking, especially in crisis communications. Being honest is underrated. Next time you in a pickle, think about it and just choose to keep things simple and be honest. Also know that the persona you project virally and in life is seen as who you are. Consider if you are happy with that? If it serves your business and your life, then it’s great, just don’t underestimate your impact. I have built a business over 15 years and at 9 years old, my junior is already planning to take it over and continue my legacy.  Even if she doesn’t, the fact that I can help her dream that big, to me, is first prize.